Baker McKenzie appoints global talent manager

by Steve Randall05 Oct 2018

Baker McKenzie has promoted its director of talent management for North America to a similar global role.

Jennifer Fox Crisp becomes global director, Talent Management, with responsibility for the ensuring the success of the firm’s People strategy across every level of the business including lawyers and business professionals.

The New York based director will report to Chief People Officer Peter May.

"I'm thrilled to be moving into this global role which will come with new challenges for me to embrace,” commented Fox Crisp. “Improving the experience of all of our people at Baker McKenzie is a great passion of mine and moving into the role will provide new opportunities to make a meaningful impact on the lives of our people all over the world.”

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The Risk and Regulation Chair will study risk governance, risk management and regulation to help organisations identify, understand, and respond to known and unknown risks.

The first to take the role is one of Australia’s leading voices in corporate and financial regulation, Professor Dimity Kingsford Smith, formerly National Australia Bank’s First Wealth Customer Advocate.

She has also held roles at the Financial Planners Association and New Zealand Financial Markets Authority and is a current member of the ASIC’s External Advisory Panel.

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With a tweet from Musk triggering the action in the first place, by suggesting he may take the firm private, the regulator says that communications with investors – including those on Twitter – must be vetted by a lawyer with qualifications that are “not unacceptable to the staff.”

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