Slater & Gordon reports large gains; Top law brands in Asia-Pacific revealed

by NZ Lawyer13 Aug 2014
Slater & Gordon reports large financial gains
Slater & Gordon has seen huge growth in revenues and profits in the last financial year. Revenue in the year to the end of June rose 40.4 per cent to AU$418.5 million, while profit was up to AU$61.1 million, a 47.2 per cent increase. A large increase in revenue has been seen in Slater’s UK operations, where personal injury makes up over a quarter of its work, with a 119 per cent rise. Further increases are predicted for the firm’s global revenues in 2015.

The top law brands in Asia-Pacific
King & Wood Mallesons is the strongest law firm brand in the Asia-Pacific region. The firm was created two years ago from the merger of China’s King & Wood with Malleson Stephen Jacques of Australia. Baker & McKenzie and Herbert Smith Freehills complete the top three in the rankings, compiled by research firm Acritas.
Another US firm enters the Beijing market
US firm Pillsbury has spoken of the firm’s commitment to China due to its increased importance in the global economy. The San Francisco based firm is opening its new Beijing office with two partners from rival US firm Paul Hastings, who are expected to take some associates with them for the new office. Pillsbury has been in China for eight years but with many of its Chinese clients headquartered in Beijing, the new office is a natural addition to its Shanghai office.

New partner for HFW in Sydney
Holman Fenwick Willan has a new partner in its Sydney office. Ian Taylor who joins this week will cover both transactional and dispute resolution matters especially for major construction, infrastructure, mining, engineering and public works projects throughout Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. 

Heirs seek their fortune with US$2 billion lawsuit against PepsiCo
The descendants of a lady whose image appears on bottles of American syrup and pancake mix have launched a David and Goliath lawsuit against food and drink giant PepsiCo. The great great grandchildren of Anna Short Harrington, the face of the Aunt Jemima brand, say that the company and its subsidiaries deliberately withheld information about the identity of the woman and paid no royalties for using her likeness. They are seeking US$2 billion in damages.