New chief executive partner for Chapman Tripp

by NZ Lawyer29 Jun 2016
Chapman Tripp has announced the appointment of corporate partner Nick Wells as incoming chief executive partner, who is set to take the reins from Andrew Poole effective 1 July.

Wells has been a partner at the firm for 13 years, specialising in corporate and private equity transactions and fund formation, leading significant acquisitions and private equity transactions in New Zealand.

“The strength of our senior leadership is both testament to, and reflective of, the high level attained by staff across the firm, which ultimately best serves the interests of our clients and enables us to continue to succeed as one of New Zealand’s leading law firms,” said Chapman Tripp chairman Roger Wallis.

Wells is responsible for the Auckland Law School’s Iwi Governance courses at undergraduate and Master’s level and is a contributing author to the Laws of New Zealand.  He will continue as Kaihautū of Chapman Tripp’s Māori Legal Group, Te Waka Ture.

“It is a privilege to lead a law firm that has been one of New Zealand’s most successful for more than 140 years,” Wells said of his appointment.

“Chapman Tripp holds a strong position in the New Zealand market – with an integral role in mergers and acquisitions, disposals, takeovers, financing, insolvency, restructuring, banking, procurement processes, large scale infrastructure projects and dispute resolution proceedings – and an increasingly global presence.

“I am excited by the opportunities and challenges ahead for the firm.”

Wells will work alongside Andy Nicholls, the firm’s managing partner – Wellington.
The firm farewells Poole, who is retiring.  Poole won ‘Managing Partner of the Year’ at the 11th annual New Zealand Law Awards last November.
 

COMMENTS

  • by Anon 29/06/2016 1:14:41 p.m.

    Seems pretty management heavy at CT - Chairman, Chief Executive Partner and Managing Partner (Wellington). Would be interested to know more about their roles are defined, and how much time they spend on management rather than fee earning.