Morning Briefing: Multinational law firm bids to crack new market

by NZ Lawyer09 Feb 2015
Baker & McKenzie bids to crack new market
Africa is a target market for many international law firms currently and Baker & McKenzie is hoping to establish itself in Kenya. Partner Chris Hogan told the FT that all the big law firms are trying to break into the same jurisdictions but Baker & McKenzie is trying to get ahead of the market. The firm was in Nairobi last week hosting a conference and is looking at capital markets as potentially big business. Hogan said that a firm that wants to be listed in the UK and Africa would be the firm’s “sweet spot”. Kenya has its own law so there is limited scope for firms practicing English law and the market is also closed to foreign firms but there is speculation that it will be opened up. 

Real estate partner checks out new locations
Kwon Lee has joined Mayer Brown in Hong Kong as a partner in its real estate practice. He joins from Lee International in Seoul where he was managing partner. Lee was formerly with Kim & Chang and also served at an international firm in New York. Lee will be returning to New York at the end of the year.

Insurance firm faces class action after data breach
US insurance firm Anthem, which last week announced it had been the victim of a cyber attack which put around 80 million customers' details at risk, is facing a law suit. The class action is being brought by Cohen & Malad in Indianapolis on behalf of client Karen Matthews and anyone else affected. The firm says it has received multiple calls from people who have, or are concerned that they will, become victims of identity theft. The class action claims that the insurer breached customer trust.

Lawyers act for sharks
Lawyers acting for singer Katy Perry have written to the owner of a website demanding that he remove a 3D model of one of her dancers. The dancer was one of the talking points at the Super Bowl for rather awkwardly dancing while dressed as a shark. The Left Shark model being sold online shortly after the Super Bowl caught the attention of Perry’s lawyers Greenberg Traurig who sent a cease and desist letter to the enterprising entrepreneur who reluctantly removed it from sale before making the design available free of charge elsewhere.