Morning Briefing: Every lawyer should study international law

by NZ Lawyer13 Apr 2015
Every lawyer should study international law
The world is interconnected like never before; more companies (and law firms) are operating globally and exploring new markets. A law student from the UK argues in an article for The Guardian that every lawyer should study, or at least be aware, of international law. Yasmin Ahmed writes that the rise of Islamic State and the threat of terrorism have made it more important for lawyers to know about different legal systems and the effects that they have on national and international policies. Robert Volterra, partner and principal of international law firm Volterra Fietta agrees because a law in one country is likely to affect others: “There are treaties regulating almost every human activity, including child custody, the content of breakfast cereals, and what compensation travellers receive if an airline loses luggage.” The article highlights that many of the growing areas of law create opportunities for those with an international focus.
 
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