Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for dinner and all things lawyering

by NZ Lawyer16 May 2016
Georgia Angus, solicitor at TGT Legal, talks about how she ended up in the law.
What made you decide to become a lawyer?
I was originally planning on attending jazz school but was strongly encouraged to have a backup plan should my jazz singing career not work out.  I also watched a lot of Boston Legal.  On that basis I enrolled in LAWS101 and from that point I didn’t consider any other career.

How long have you worked at TGT Legal and what brought you to this position?
I’ve been at TGT Legal for 8 months.  My previous role was in the property team at a large commercial firm.  I wanted to work in litigation and loved the idea of working at a boutique firm for private clients so TGT Legal was perfect.  It’s a brilliant place to work.

What’s the strangest case you’ve ever worked on/been involved with?
In my short litigation career I haven’t had many cases, let alone strange ones.

If you could invite three people for dinner, dead or alive and excluding family and friends, who would they be and why?
Amy Winehouse to entertain, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to inspire and Prince Harry for some insight into my favourite family.

You’re based in Auckland – where’s the best place to go for a drink and/or dinner after work?
Racket Bar, Federal Deli and Woodpecker Hill are some of my favourites.  There are endless places to choose from in Auckland.

What’s the best piece of advice (work or personal) you’ve ever been given?
It’s better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. 

Do you have any hobbies/interests outside of work?
Is eating a hobby?  I spend too much time investigating new cafes and restaurants.  I also dabble in various musical pursuits and enjoy live comedy shows.

Complete this sentence: If I wasn’t a lawyer, I would be…
A television news presenter, à la Hilary Barry.

What do you think will be single biggest issue facing the legal space in New Zealand in 2016?
For my area, I think advising clients in light of the decision in Clayton and the litigation that will stem from that case.

If you had John Key’s job for one day, what would you do?
I would revisit the refugee quota and look at how we can address the terrible rates of child abuse in New Zealand.

What do you love about your job?
I love the collegiality of being a lawyer and being part of the legal community.  There are so many brilliant people to learn from and so many opportunities to do so. 

What would you change about your job right now if you could?
A sparkling water tap in the office would be fantastic!