Asia-Pac leads the world on IPO activity

by Steve Randall24 Mar 2016
Asia-Pac leads the world on IPO activity
IPO activity has fallen globally but Asia-Pacific leads the world on new stock market listings. A report from EY shows that global IPO activity fell to just 167 deals in the first quarter of 2016. The listings raised U$12.1 billion. It’s the weakest first quarter since 2009 and is 39 per cent lower in volume terms and 70 per cent down in capital raised compared to Q1 in 2015.
For law firms in Asia-Pacific there were also fewer clients to advise on with IPO activity down 31 per cent in volume terms and 55 per cent for capital raised; but the region accounted for 61 per cent of global IPO volumes.
Ringo Choi, Asia-Pacific IPO Leader commented that despite the global concerns over growth and turbulence for oil and equities subduing IPO volumes here “the region is still the world’s most active in terms of IPO listings and the prospects for a swift rebound are positive.” Japan is on course for a record year, he said. Chinese authorities are also planning support for IPO activity.
 
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Regulator announces reduction in lawyers’ rule book
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